Longue Vue Gardens

Available: April 12 Morning & April 13 – Afternoon
Tour Duration: 3 Hours
Cost per Person: $75

Longue Vue House and Gardens was designed and built between 1939 and 1942 for Edgar and Edith Stern and their three children by landscape architect Ellen Biddle Shipman and architects William and Geoffrey Platt. Shipman, the Platt brothers, and the Sterns worked closely together to create a masterpiece of utility and beauty uniting the house and gardens.

Consisting of a main house, 8 dependencies, 5 structures, 14 garden areas, and 22 fountains and ponds located on an eight-acre site, Longue Vue House and Gardens is one of the last Country Place Era homes built in the United States.

Longue Vue was designed and built between 1939 and 1942 for Mr. and Mrs. Edgar B. Stern and their three children. Mr. Stern was a cotton-broker with business interests in real estate, minerals, and timber. With his eldest son, Edgar Jr., he began WDSU, the first television station in Louisiana. Mrs. Stern was the daughter of Julius Rosenwald, one of the founders of Sears, Roebuck and Company. Longue Vue’s architects, William and Geoffery Platt, and landscape architect Ellen Biddle Shipman worked together to create a masterpiece of unity between house and gardens. Designed in the Classical Revival Style, the house and its dependencies are axially sited on an eight-acre estate. When the Sterns employed Ellen Biddle Shipman in 1935 to work on their garden, she had already achieved a national reputation. House and Garden magazine described her as the “Dean of American Women Landscape Architects”. Her clients included the Fords, Astors, duPonts and Seiberlings. Longue Vue is the only unchanged Shipman-designed garden open to the public.

Longue Vue was added to Register of National Historic Places in 2005 by the U.S Department of the Interior.

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